sman

Liebe Leser
Sport-heute.ch schliesst seine Tore. Nach 11 Jahren möchte ich andere Projekte verwirklichen, auf Reisen gehen und das Leben endlich in vollen Zügen geniessen. Es waren 11 wundervolle Jahre mit Ihnen. Sport-heute.ch bleibt mindestens die nächsten Jahre als Bilderbuch noch bestehen. Doch jeder Abschied kann auch ein neuer Anfang sein. Nun ist es endgültig. Ich wünsche Ihnen eine weiterhin schöne Zeit. Ich danke Ihnen für die Lesertreue und Ihre ehrliche Begeisterung mit grosser Dankbarkeit. Danke, dass ich Sie 11 Jahre verwöhnen durfte.

Tschau und auf Wiedersehen.

Ihr
Marcel Krebs

Wer weiterhin mit mir und Sämi in Kontakt bleiben will, kann dies über meinen persönlichen Blog.
www.marcelkrebs.ch.

Dear Users
Sport-heute.ch closes its gates. After 11 years I would like to realize other projects, go on journeys and finally enjoy life to the fullest. There were 11 wonderful years with you. Sport-heute.ch will continue to exist as a picture book for at least the next few years. But every farewell can also be a new beginning. Now it is final. I wish you a good time. I would like to thank the readership and your honest enthusiasm with great gratitude. Thank you for spoiling you for 11 years.

Chess and goodbye.

you
Marcel Krebs

Anyone who wants to stay in touch with me and Sämi can do so through my personal blog.
www.marcelkrebs.ch.

 

 

COLD AS ICE

Geschrieben von Marcel Krebs am .

 photo sent from the boat foresight natural energy on december 8th 2016 photo conrad colmanphoto envoyee depuis le bateau foresight natural energy le 8 decembre 2016 photo conrad colmansplash welcome back from the mast w

 Almost 4600 miles back from the leader and currently in twelfth place, Conrad Colman is around thirty miles ahead of his closest rival Arnaud Boissières (La Mie Câline). In addition to the threat of being caught, the New Zealander also had the worry of an iceberg warning on his mind, as he explained in his blog this morning.

The world has changed back to grey although conditions are still pleasant. Notice that I'm talking in general terms here because my instruments are still uncooperative so I have no notion of wind angle or speed other than my experience of years at sea. However it's not the air that bothers me at the moment, it's water. The sea is really cold and even short exposure to it during a sail change leaves my hands so cold and weak that I can't even rip open a soup packet! Also, falling off the train that Stephane and Nandor are still on has forced me to dive south, close to the Kerguelen Islands and close to an iceberg detected by satellites four days ago. As I write this I have just crossed over the waypoint for the observed 30 meter iceberg as I figured the best way to avoid a moving target is to sail exactly over the point where it was last seen!


In addition to my work on the boat, planning the navigation, trimming etc I now turn my binoculars to the horizon at regular intervals looking for hard water. I saw an iceberg in my first race around the world in 2012 near Cape Horn and it was impressive and scary for all that it represented... a near invisible, undetectable by radar, solid dangerous lump! I have good visibility and only one target to miss so I'm not too concerned about this Vendee cocktail being served on ice, although an encounter would leave me both shaken and stirred!

 

 

Kommentar schreiben


Sicherheitscode
Aktualisieren